JMIH 2017: Brown Anole Reproductive Output Varies Seasonally

TMitchell_JMIH2017

Tim Mitchell, Josh Hall, and Daniel Warner: Seasonal Shifts in Anolis sagrei Reproduction Invoke Challenges for Scientific Reproducibility

Sometimes a scientist just needs hundreds of hatchling anoles for an experiment. Tim Mitchell found himself in this position recently, and, like a good lizard ecologist, he started breeding colonies of anoles in the lab to produce eggs to incubate until hatching. As he created three different breeding colonies from brown anoles (Anolis sagrei) in central Florida, one each in February, June, and September, Tim found that he had also created an ideal situation in which to examine how the reproductive condition and output of brown anoles varies across the breeding season.

Tim, along with his coauthors Josh Hall and Dan Warner, found that females produced eggs with significantly greater mass later in the breeding season. These eggs took longer to produce than those earlier in the year (a greater interclutch interval), and the eggs resulted in hatchlings that had higher mass in relation to the weight of their eggs. These reproductive differences remained even after accounting for the fact that female anoles were also larger and heavier later in the year.

These findings suggest that female A. sagrei may shift their reproductive effort from producing a higher quantity of eggs (i.e., more, smaller eggs resulting in smaller hatchlings) in the beginning of the breeding season, to producing higher quality eggs (i.e., fewer, larger eggs resulting in larger offspring) later in the breeding season. Tim’s findings also stress the importance of investigating and accounting for seasonal differences when examining reproductive output in lizards.

 

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