Nectarivory by and Predation upon Anolis occultus: Natural History Data at Last!

nectarivory

Remarkably little is known about the natural history of the Puerto Rican twig anole, Anolis occultus, except where it sleeps. The reason is simple: thepredation animal is small, moves slowly, is highly cryptic and probably spends a lot of its time amidst the twigs high in the canopy. As a result, there have been reports of only a handful of animals located while they are active.

In a just published paper, Ríos-López and colleagues report two new observations of these charming little lizards, one of nectarivory (above) and the other, sadly, of predation by a kingbird (right). In addition, the paper presents a comprehensive review of what we know about this species and its conservation prospects.

 

About Jonathan Losos

Professor and Curator of Herpetology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University. I've spent my entire professional career studying anoles and have discovered that the more I learn about anoles, the more I realize I don't know.

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